The Domino Sugar Refinery

June 6th, 2007 -

The Domino Sugar Refinery - in Williamsburg, Brooklyn - is a massive industrial complex on the East River. Shut down several years ago, Domino still houses hundreds of pieces of heavy industrial equipment. Abandoned offices, lunchrooms, science labs, locker rooms and loading bays are in one building, while another houses floor after floor of vats, boilers and furnaces. Molasses covers every surface, burnt brown sugar cakes the floor, and a sickening sweet stench pervades the entire complex. Domino is one of the last remnants of Brooklyn's historic industrial waterfront and may soon be landmarked.

Three other photographers also have shots from this expedition into the complex : F-Trainer, Blue Jake and Mercurialn.

Update: The Domino Sugar Refinery was partially landmarked in September, 2007. However, almost every area seen in the following photographs is slated for demolition.



This Way Out


Molasses and Insulation


The Locker Room


Peeling


Decayed Bay


Ground Floor


Furnace


Peeling Stairwell


Open Windows


Hatches and Columns


String Machine


Tangled


Tripod


Massive Blue Bin


Inside the Skybridge


Glass and Wire


Science Lab/"For Food Only"


Domino Tower


Sugar Coated


The view from above - Kent Street


Company Colors/Inside the Tower


Triptych

24 comments:

  1. Meghan O'HaraJune 6, 2007 at 12:45 PM

    Domino!!

    It's like you're going 'all city'

    I think you may need to make a tangent photo essay on sugar processing plants.

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  2. i'm liking the furnace room, which I had not seen until now.

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  3. Yeah, the furnace room was day two... deep in the bowels of the building...

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  4. These images are breathtaking...How in the world did you get access?

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  5. You have an incredible eye for composition and color...rot and decay never looked so good...The end. Of an era...

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  6. These are amazing. They totally blow me away.

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  7. Great photos. I live right near there. Hope they don't tear it down! How did you get inside?

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  8. Alot of people have asked about gaining access to the Domino plant. Unfortunately, its currently closed to the general public. I hope they keep the buildings standing, as a landmark, so that everyone can go inside one day! The place would make a great museum.

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  9. Wow, those are very cool shots. Back when the plant was still operational I used to live a few blocks away and always wondered about the inside-- thanks for sharing.

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  10. Oi, achei teu blog pelo google tá bem interessante gostei desse post. Quando der dá uma passada pelo meu blog, é sobre camisetas personalizadas, mostra passo a passo como criar uma camiseta personalizada bem maneira. Até mais.

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  11. i acctualy tried getting in there today but its all fenced up. ill probably come back wiht some pliars or sumthing for the fence. anyway, some of the people are wrong, this place wouldnt be cool if they would make it a and mark. that would meen that it would lose its beaty, by beaty i mean theat feeling that you get knowing that 11 acers worth of heave metal ocnstruction is all left to you. besides, if it woudl become a land mark then they would clean it and that woudl preety much suck too.

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  12. If it there was any possibility that the developers who bought this complex would let it sit in a state of permanent abandonment, then - as a photographer - I would prefer that. But asking New York City to keep large swaths of industrial land abandoned just so people can take photographs seems somewhat unreasonable. And since the only choice is between landmarking or demolishing these buildings, I'd prefer landmarking.

    I'm just trying to catch these places before they are gone.

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  13. I worked there for 24 years, and can't believe the way it looks now.
    I left in 2000 after the 18 month strike. Great pictures which bring back alot of memories for me.

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  14. I worked at Domino for 26 years. I can give you the real name to some of those photos that you have.
    Frank

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  15. Dennis and Chic Man - I would definitely like to hear more about your time working at this refinery. It was hard to imagine it has only been closed down for a few years... the interior of the factory is now so decayed.

    you can reach me at this email:
    thegowanus@yahoo.com

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  16. i worked there for 26 years and can tell you the names of most of the areas that have pictures.
    CCHICSTERS@VERIZON.NET

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  17. the pictures are amazing. although it kinda looks creepy and scary. That makes a good photo. you convey emotions through your pictures.


    great shots.
    mc

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  18. I use to work there and I know the real names to all the pictures shown. CCHICSTERS@HOTMAIL.COM

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  19. NATHAN- CAN YOU CALL ME? OR SEND AN EMAIL? THANKS,

    LEAH KREGER

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  20. Leah -

    I don't have your email or phone number, so no, I can't contact you.

    My email is:
    thegowanus[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Nathan

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  21. These are all great photos. I especially like "Open Windows" for all the bright happy colors of yellow, spring green and aqua amidst the dirty castle-like walls. I just came to your site via The Very Short List.

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  22. Amazing photos. Here is a link to our post on our site.http://www.grouphomebikes.com/2010/02/domino-sugar-factory-condos/

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  23. call me 267 -3775805 I work there for over 20 years. I can give real names to pictures Frank

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  24. It is really a waste of land; the proximity to water would make it an ideal place to build homes with playgrounds, biking lanes shopping centers in order to make use of this land.

    Politicians in Williamsburg should work a little harder in helping the community instead of making so
    many promises they should take action.

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